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Australia, a global leader in moving towards unity

Despite the recent events of 2020 Australians appear to be rallying together. Not only is Australia considered the ‘lucky country’ but three in five Australians (59%) believe that over the next three years, Australia will become more united.

This is in stark contrast to other countries such as the United States, which more than one in two Australians (52%) believe will become more divided and only three in ten Australians (29%) believe will become more united over the next three years. Similarly, three in ten Australians (30%) believe that Asia will become more divided.

Younger generations believe, overall, the world will become more united

Younger generations are more likely than their older counterparts to believe that the world will become more united over the next three years (57% Gen Z, 40% Gen Y cf. 25% Gen X, 20% Baby Boomers, 18% Builders). Interestingly, younger generations have the most positive outlook being more likely to believe that countries will become more united in the future.

Gen Z in particular have the most positive outlook, with Asia (47% Gen Z cf. 34% Gen Y, 21% Gen X, 16% Baby Boomers, 18% Builders) and Australia (76% Gen Z, cf. 61% Gen Y, 55% Gen X, 51% Baby Boomers, 57% Builders) displaying the greatest generational differences for unity over the next three years.

Australians believe they need to work harder to bridge division in socio-economic status

While the majority of Australian’s might believe that Australia will become more united, there are areas in which we can work harder to bridge division. Australians identify socio-economic status (88%), ethnicity (86%) and indigenous and non-indigenous (85%) as the top three areas of division our community needs to work harder to bridge.

Interestingly, younger generations are more likely than older generations to believe division amidst gender (86% Gen Z, 82% Gen Y cf. 71% Gen X, 76% Baby Boomers, 79% Builders) and the state or territory from which they’re from (83% Gen Z, 79% Gen Y cf. 71% Gen X, 71% Baby Boomers, 77% Builders) are areas the community needs to work harder to bridge.